‘Responsibilty to Protect’ | A Runaway Train to a New World Order

R2P: Promoting a New World Order


Diana West|FavStocks

The United Nations reported in July 2009: The Obama administration is supporting moves to implement a U.N. doctrine calling for collective military action to halt genocide. In a week-long debate on implementing the Responsibility to Protect Doctrine, the U.S. joined a majority of U.N. countries, including Russia and China, in supporting implementation of the policy. The doctrine itself was approved in 2005 by more than 150 states including the U.S. The doctrine specifies that diplomatic options such as internal conflict resolution, sanctions and prosecution by the International Criminal Court, should be used first. If they don’t work, then a multi-national force approved by the Security Council would be deployed.

Aaron Klein is another one of the rare writers who key into Obama’s hard Left vibe (and he wrote a great book about it, too), eschewing explanations of “inexperience” or “ineptitude” to parse Obama. Having carried the ” R2P” story down the line to George $oro$ last week (link below), Klein reports that a principal author of RSP, Ramesh Thakur (above left) also happens to be — uncap your smelling salts — a proponent of “international redistribution.”

Klein writes at WND.com:

The author of a military doctrine used by the Obama administration to justify the recent airstrikes targeting the regime of Moammar Gadhafi in Libya recently advocated for a “global rebalancing” and “international redistribution” to create a “New World Order.”

The author, Ramesh Thakur, is a fellow at the Centre for International Governance Innovation, which is in partnership with an economic institute founded by philanthropist billionaire George Soros. Thakur is also closely tied with other Soros-funded initiatives.

WND was first to report last week that Soros is also a primary funder and key proponent of the global organization that promotes the military doctrine “Responsibility to Protect,” cited by the White House as allowing the use of force to attack Gadhafi’s forces.

The joint U.S. and international air strikes targeting Libya are widely regarded as a test of Responsibility to Protect – a set of principles, now backed by the United Nations, based on the idea that sovereignty is not a privilege but a responsibility that can be revoked if a country is accused of “war crimes,” “genocide,” “crimes against humanity” or “ethnic cleansing.”
The term “war crimes” has at times been indiscriminately used by various U.N.-backed international bodies, including the International Criminal Court, or ICC, which applied it to Israeli anti-terror operations in the Gaza Strip.

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