X-Ray Nation | TSA May Be Spreading Disease From Passenger to Passenger

Doctors sound TSA germ alert | Dangers include syphilis, lice, viruses, ringworm

By Bob Unruh|WorldNetDaily

Syphilis, lice, gonorrhea, ringworm, chlamydia, staph, strep, noro and papilloma viruses all are part of the possible fringe benefits when airline passengers next go through a full hands-on pat-down by agents of the federal government’s Transportation Security Administration, according to doctors.

WND reported two days ago on alarmed passengers who noted that TSA agents doing the pat-downs that have been described by critics as molestation since they include touching private body parts were not changing gloves between passengers. In fact, some apparently were patting down dozens of passengers or more wearing the same gloves.

But neither the TSA nor federal agencies such as the Centers for Disease Control was willing to comment on the possibilities that infections and other loathsome afflictions could be passed from passenger to passenger.

Now two doctors – and several others – have confirmed that there is the definite possibility that passengers will be able to catch whatever someone in front of them in line was suffering from via the latex gloves TSA workers use.

“There is no doubt that bacteria (staph, strep, v.cholerae etc.) and viruses (noro, enteroviruses, herpes, hepatitis A and papilloma viruses) can be spread by contaminated vinyl or latex gloves,” Dr. Thomas Warner of Wisconsin told WND in a letter to the editor.

“If a traveler has diarrhea and is soiled, as can and does happen, the causative agent can be spread by this method since bacteria and viruses in moist environments have greater viability.”

He continued. “The traveler readjusting clothes can easily get the infectious agents on their hands and therefore into their mouth, nose or eyes.”

Added a pulmonary critical care physician from Connecticut who did not want to be identified by name, “That doesn’t make sense that they’re not changing gloves.”

“Anything can be transmitted. If there are open wounds and they [TSA agents] are not aware, there’s syphilis, gonorrhea, herpes, chlamydia, lice, ringworm.”

Worse yet would be for people whose immune systems are compromised by treatments they may be having, including cancer patients, she said.

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